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From the archives: Barnsley's 19th Century nail makers
IN THE medieval period, nails were hand made in small rural workshops next to workers’ cottages.
Such an industry thrived in the village of Hoylandswaine, where by the 18th century, nail makers, if not full-time, would have fitted in forging work in between working in the fields.
Records show that by 1806, there were around 60 nail makers in Hoylandswaine, increasing to 90 in 1851.
But by 1861, this figure had fallen to 53, and...
The great mascot confusion - cleared up
PEOPLE of a certain age will have heard tales of the original Barnsley FC mascot... and it’s not Toby Tyke.
Amos Riley was the first recognised mascot at Oakwell and he was more than happy to make an ass of himself.
Confusion has lingered for many years over whether Amos was the man or the donkey in the double act but Kevin Langley wanted to clear it up once and for all.
He said:...
From the archives - free download of Barnsley Chronicle - December 2009
We have started re-visiting past editions from our extensive archives at the Chronicle and wanted to share a couple with you.
The third one is from this time of year but in 2009 and it is free to download here: https://www.barnsleychronicle.com/storage/pdf/bc-11-12-2009.pdf (51.2 MB) Please note the file size before you download.
Keep visiting the Chronicle website for the next instalment.
Trip across the pond for bell ringers
THURLSTONE Handbell Ringers were formed in 1855.
The minutes of Thurlstone School Board stated that the bell ringers should always have a room in which to rehearse.
They won the Yorkshire Handbell Ringers Association Shield and Cup in 1930, 1931 and 1932 and first prize in the English Championships of 1930.
Winners of the English Championships in 1930. Back row- L. Sykes, C. Mitchell, N. Crossland, M. Walshaw, E. Wood. Front row- T. Sykes,...
From the archives - free download of Barnsley Chronicle - December 1950
We have started re-visiting past editions from our extensive archives at the Chronicle and wanted to share a couple with you.The second one is from this time of year but in 1950 and it is free to download here: https://www.barnsleychronicle.com/storage/pdf/bc-16-12-1950.pdf (16.2 MB) Please note the file size before you download.Keep visiting the Chronicle website for the next instalment. We really hope you enjoy going back in time and think you will be a big fan of the adverts...
From the archives - free download of Barnsley Chronicle - December 1980
We have started re-visiting past editions from our extensive archives at the Chronicle and wanted to share a couple with you.
The first one is from this time of year but in 1980 and it is free to download here: https://www.barnsleychronicle.com/storage/pdf/bc-12-12-1980.pdf (64.4 MB) Please note the file size before you download.
Keep visiting the Chronicle website for the next instalment. We really hope you enjoy going back in time and think you will be a big...
Chart topping performances at the Civic - looking back to 1974
THE prospect of chart-toppers playing a concert in Barnsley seems pretty far-fetched nowadays.
But for music fans back in 1974, it was a regular occurrence with the biggest acts of the day regularly taking centre stage at the Civic Hall.
There were regular appearances from artists in the top ten with The Bay City Rollers, Suzi Quatro, Cockey Rebel, Mud and Showaddywaddy all featuring.
It was the Scottish heartthrobs who caused the biggest stir and...
Barnsley ferret-legger wows Aussies on TV chat show
THE art of ferret-legging may be from a bygone age but it once earned a Barnsley man fame... and a trip to Australia.
Back in early 1985, the famed ferret-legger Reg Mellor, proved a major hit Down Under with his unusual skill.
Reg, who was 74 at the time and living on Honeywell Street, appeared on the Mike Walsh Show on Australian TV where he wowed the host and audience alike by putting three ferrets...
History society help residents dig a little deeper into their roots
OF the many pastimes people have taken up during lockdown, genealogy has been at the top of the tree. Ashley Ball finds out more from the Barnsley Family History Society.
FOR people researching their ancestral roots in Barnsley, the town’s family history society is often a port of call.
Membership with the 35-year-old society during lockdown has risen significantly to 250 members as people have gone online and in some cases hit proverbial brick walls....
Permanent home for town's historic artefacts
SOME of what lies beneath us has been brought into the light and since the opening of Experience Barnsley in 2013, it is on show where it belongs. In part four of the series, Ashley Ball looks at how closely we can see into the town’s long history.
Without a dedicated home for archaeological finds, a lot of Barnsley’s discoveries were taken away from where they had laid undisturbed for centuries. That all changed with...
Andrew's potty discovery leads to more digging
STUMBLING upon Roman-era pottery in his garden set Andrew Allen on a journey of discovery. In the third instalment in a series of features unearthing the past, Ashley Ball digs deeper into almost 2,000 years of local history.
Luckily Andrew knew the value of what he was digging up. He is thankful that his own thriftiness resulted in him deciding to bury rubble rather than get a skip. That is when he quickly began to...
Looking back at Penistone Operatic Society’s Beginnings
PENISTONE has always enjoyed a great community spirit and in the past had a host of theatrical and choral groups to entertain the community.
Sadly, like many events, television, videos and digital devices took their toll on not just audiences but people willing or inclined to give time and talent for the benefit of the community.
The first ever pay performed by Penistone Players
Penistone Operatic Society’s musicals complete with orchestra...
History group appeals for new members
MEMBERS of a group who have recorded Cudworth’s history for more than two decades are on the lookout for more people to join.
Cudworth History Group was formed 25 years ago by members who hoped to find out more about the mining village’s past.
The group quickly grew and members have gone on to produce books about their findings.
Members were also instrumental in adding names to Cudworth’s war memorial at St John’s Church -...
Town's history comes to the surface
WORK is ongoing to ensure the history of the town keeps coming to the surface. In the final part of the archaelogical series, Ashley Ball speaks to experts about recent discoveries, getting the public involved and future projects.
Elsecar’s industrial past is likely to keep archaeologists busy for some time while also affording local people the chance to get up close to their ancestors and heritage. The rich history in the village has been closer...
Darfield's links to 'Eternal City' explored
ROMAN coins were once so prevalent in Darfield that kids used to trade them for conkers. In his latest instalment, Ashley Ball speaks to local historian Martyn Johnson to dig up even more on the village’s strong links to the ‘Eternal City’.
 
The Roman empire was vast, fearsome and mighty - and it was partially powered by an inland port... in Barnsley.
It has to, at this stage, be a theory but local historian Martyn...
Egyptologist links Darfield finds to Antony and Cleopatra
PROFESSOR Joann Fletcher is respected around the globe for her knowledge of ancient Egypt but how did coins minted by Antony and Cleopatra end up in her hometown? As part of a series of features, Ashley Ball delves into what has been found beneath our feet in Barnsley.
Ancient Egypt and Darfield seem miles apart. According to internet route planners it’s 3,633 miles by road. That is a long distance journey even by today’s standards...